What are some Best Rap Songs About Depression?

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This blog will cover what is depression, a list of songs about depression, a brief introduction of each rap song, and also answer frequently asked questions. 

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What are some Best Rap Songs About Depression?

Music and songs have been quite revolutionizing these days. There are various amazing rap songs about depression like Tupac’s So many Tears, DMX’s Slippin, Lil Wayne’s I Feel Like Dying, etc. 

Let us discuss these songs in detail in the further sections but before that let us understand a little about depression. 

Music and Mental Health

Our public conversation is dominated by discussions about mental health and despair. Slowly but steadily, the public dialogue around mental wellbeing — both offline and online — has helped to erase the stigma associated with depression.

Though society has lately evolved the vocabulary and viewpoint to broaden our knowledge — through statistics and first-hand stories — the present discourse around psychological health and depression isn’t entirely new; it’s been gently funneled through music throughout history. 

And, traditionally, gangster rap has always acted as a platform for musicians to express themselves.

Rap songs and mental health

“Hip-hop is our therapy,” remarked the late Prodigy. However, the debate about mental health is continuously expanding beyond that concept — further than the catharsis of producing and listening to music. 

Hip-hop artists have gone deeper into expressing the realities of mental wellbeing and how it impacts their career and personal life, from openly seeking treatment to dealing via self-care. All of these transparencies and traceability in their music contribute to a better knowledge of mental health.

What is depression, exactly?

Depression is a widespread mental condition that affects around 8% of the population. It has an impact on all elements of our life, from how we see to how we live and interact. 

Depression not only impairs people’s capacity to appreciate pleasure, but it also leads them to experience intense, unremitting grief. People lose faith in activities they used to enjoy, withdraw from everyday relationships, lose or put on weight for no obvious cause, and suffer from a range of health issues.

Exhaustion and sluggishness are symptoms of depression. It also hinders one’s capacity to participate in anything, especially once-enjoyable pursuits (anhedonia). Even if they are sleeping much more than normal, sorrow can produce a drop in activity levels in humans.

List of Best Rap Songs about Depression

The Notorious B.I.G — “Suicidal Thoughts” (1994)

Death was a recurring subject in The Notorious B.I.G.’s songs, and nowhere is this more evident than on “Suicidal Thoughts.” “Suicidal Thoughts,” produced by the renowned Lord Finesse, was probably one of the most remarkable rap tracks on the late rapper’s first album Ready to Die.

“Suicidal Thoughts” is a suicide letter in which Big is torn about the hand life has handed him, and he contacts Puff Daddy to convey the decision he has already made.

Tupac — “So Many Tears” (1995)

Tupac was among the most captivating figures in hip-hop history. His impact on culture is still felt today. 

Me Against The World, his iconic third album, engages with every emotion of the human experience, sharing his innermost sentiments as never before against the background of an imminent jail term. 

“So Many Tears” captures Tupac’s vulnerability as he worried for his life, had suicide ideas, and battled psychosis.

A Tribe Called Quest, Faith Evans & Consequence — “Stressed Out” (1996)

A Tribe Called Quest was a trailblazing band. The pattern that so many have followed was devised by Q-Tip, Ali Shaheed Muhammad, and the late Phife Dawg. 

On “Stressed Out,” off their fourth album, Beats, Rhymes, and Life, the gang discussed navigating anxiousness on “Stressed Out,” which includes Faith Evans and Consequence. The song illustrated all of the mental contortions that Black people must perform just to live. 

“Stressed Out,” published as a single in 1996, speaks about the reality of anxiety, using prescribed medication, and developing strong support networks long before becoming mainstream.

DMX — “Slippin’” (1998)

DMX has experienced his fair share of struggles during his career, including drug addiction, alcoholism, psychosis, and manic depression.

The song “Slippin” from Flesh of My Flesh, Blood of My Blood is a form of exorcism. In the song, X reflects on all the horrible experiences in his existence and how they affected him. 

X declares with piercing clarity in the opening chorus, “This life crap, this life shit is like is like bugged the fuck out, son, for real.” To live, after all, is to endure. But in order to survive. That is, to find purpose in one’s suffering.”

Jean Grae — “Keep Livin’” (2003)

Jean Grae is your favorite rapper. Her lyrical escapades have earned her fame as an underground MC. 

She stands up to the plate on “Keep Livin,” from her 2003 CD The Bootleg of the Bootleg EP, and gives some insight on how mental difficulties have affected her family and how she copes with the burden. Ms. Grae says, with poetic clarity, one of the methods she copes with despair is to “Keep Livin.”

Lil Wayne — “I Feel Like Dying” (2007)

Lil Wayne handles the subject of suicide thoughts with vulnerability, sing the chorus “I feel like dying” – a sample of Karma’s “Once” — on repeat. While at the height of his powers, Lil Wayne confronted his own mental health issues and acknowledged his drug use. 

Although drug use has long been such a part of hip-hop culture, Wayne, the world’s most successful rapper at the time, detailed his dependence on the anti-anxiety prescription Xanax as a game-changer. 

Wayne paved the path for rappers to talk up about the terrible consequences of drugs and how mental disorders affect people in a variety of ways.

Eminem — “Beautiful” (2009)

Eminem’s sixth studio album, Relapse, contains the track “Beautiful.” He started writing the song while in treatment in 2005 to cope with his sleep medicine addiction. He didn’t finish the song until he became clean a few years later when he added a fourth stanza. 

Eminem uses emotion to discuss his drug addiction in this gloomy track. “Beautiful” has been the only tune he preserved during his time in treatment. He elaborated:

One of the very few reasons I put that song up there is because I think it’s the greatest of the bunch of songs I did while I wasn’t sober.

“This is it for me,” I thought at the moment. I composed the first stanza as well as a half in treatment and finished it after I got out. It’s the only music that reminds me of that time without transporting me back there.

Chance the Rapper & Nico Segal — “Long Time II” (2012)

Chance the Rapper proudly wears his beliefs on his sleeves and makes no apologies for it. Even persons of faith, however, are not immune to the emotional ups and downs that come with life’s roller coaster. 

“Long Time II,” which features Nico Segal, is a heartfelt appeal about negotiating the dark pit of loss and despair. Chance bares his emotions over a mournful piano, keeping little back as she seeks release from his inner agony.

Pharoahe Monch & Denaun Porter – “Losing My Mind” (2014)

Pharoahe Monch’s legacy as a great songwriter is indelible. Monch has used his music to delve deep into his own metal troubles from his days as a member of Organised Konfusion.

Monch’s concept album Post Traumatic Stress Disorder is about various forms of PTSD. Monch was dealing with despair and attempting to stay sober during the recording session. PTSD was not a metaphor, but rather a reflection of his experiences.

Monch’s effort to add to the collective debate about the need for counseling in the African American community is “Losing My Mind.” He deftly illustrates the internal battle of someone suffering from a failing mental disease as he navigates through the dark of sadness.

Joe Budden & Emanny – “Only Human” (2015)

Joe Budden was a tough and well-respected hip-hop MC when he became a media sensation. He was an open book, and he spilled his guts on “Only Human.” 

“Only Human,” from his Some Love Lost EP, was performed just after he was freed from prison and recounts his battle with his mental state. It also documents his suicidal and depressive ideas.

Kendrick Lamar — “​U” (2015)

Kendrick Lamar is among hip-most hop’s famous MCs. His poetic creativity enables him to cover a wide range of topics with depth and vivid insight. “u,” which appears on his highly lauded LP To Pimp A Butterfly, delves into his earlier experiences with despair, suicide ideas, and survivor’s guilt. 

Composing the tune, according to Lamar, was a challenging task. “That was one of the hardest songs I had to compose,” Lamar remarked in an interview. There are some extremely gloomy parts in there. All of my anxieties, selfishness, and disappointments. That thing is motherfucking sad. But it does help. It is beneficial.”

Vic Mensa — “There’s A lot Going On” (2016)

Vic Mensa has indeed been candid about his mental health difficulties. His otherworldly ability as an MC is only equaled by the internal pressures with which he is always at odds. Mensa’s artistic expression aids him in coping with psychological stress and maintaining his sanity. 

Mensa makes a strong aesthetic statement in “There’s A Lot Going On,” in which he dives into his own psyche and contends with his inner demons. Throughout the song, Mensa portrays an image of his own problems with mental health, as well as his usage of drugs and alcohol to cope with the agony.

Solange & Lil Wayne – “Mad” (2016)

Solange discusses a variety of themes with striking clarity on her magnum opus, A Seat at the Table. “Mad,” starring Lil Wayne, is a study of Black emotional vulnerability. She calls into question the basic premise that African Americans must explain their rage in the wake of American injustice.

Lil Wayne covers many of the things that irritate him in one of his most candid songs, but he also discusses his attempted suicide at a young age. Weezy has previously acknowledged the gunshot, but it’s the first time he admits it was a suicide attempt.

Kid Cudi – “Wounds” (2016)

Kid Cudi had an emotional breakdown in 2013 after terminating a romance. He stated on social media in 2016 that he had put himself into a treatment facility due to his difficulties with prescription medicines, anxiety, sadness, and suicidal thoughts. Cudi’s music is frequently infused with mental health struggles.

Cudi traverses through many emotional states and the repercussions they inflict on “Wounds,” off his Passion, Pain & Demon Slayin’ album. “Wounds” is an honest depiction of an artist battling for their mental health.

Conclusion

Music therapy appears to alleviate depressive symptoms and anxiety while also improving functionality (e.g., maintaining involvement in jobs, activities, and relationships). It is debatable if music therapy is superior to psychological therapy. 

Future studies should look at depression, and subsequent trial reports should go into detail about music therapy therapies, other treatments, and the people who give them.

Frequently asked Questions (FAQs): What are some Best Rap Songs About Depression?

Is music therapy effective in treating depression?

Music therapy appears to alleviate depressive symptoms and anxiety while also improving functionality (e.g., maintaining involvement in jobs, activities, and relationships).

What types of music might assist with depression?

Rock is the most popular genre among sad listeners, followed by experimental, pop, and hip-hop/rap. Blues, on the other hand, is the lowest-rated genre for persons looking to boost their mood. Easy listening, R&B/soul, techno, and classical music are all underappreciated.

What types of music might assist with depression?

Rock is the most popular genre among sad listeners, followed by experimental, pop, and hip-hop/rap. Blues, on the other hand, is the lowest-rated genre for persons looking to boost their mood. Easy listening, R&B/soul, techno, and classical music are all underappreciated

Are rappers depressed?

Rappers suffering from depression come in a variety.   Some prominent rappers are depressed ego with alcohol and drugs, but others have sought help through counseling or treatment clinics. Some notable rappers who suffered from depression even created songs about their experiences

Do you get anxious when you listen to rap music?

Taken as a whole, 28 percent of the songs indicated anxiety, more than a fifth addressed depression, and 6 percent discussed suicide. “We also discovered a statistically significant rise in the fraction of popular rap songs that mention melancholy, suicide, and analogies about mental health difficulties,” Kresovich said.

Do you get anxious when you listen to rap music?

Taken as a whole, 28 percent of the songs indicated anxiety, more than a fifth addressed depression, and 6 percent discussed suicide. “We also discovered a statistically significant rise in the fraction of famous rap songs that mention melancholy, suicide, and analogies about mental health difficulties,” Kresovich said.

References

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2020/12/201207112255.htm
https://www.ranker.com/list/depressed-rappers-with-depression/ranker-hip-hop
https://itsoktotalk.in/find-help/

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