Are ENFP Good At Sales? ( A Complete Guide)

In this guide, we will answer the question: “Are ENFP Good at Sales?”. We will also look at some of the other potential career options for the ENFP and a few interesting aspects of the ENFP personality type.

When it comes to careers, each of us has often found ourselves pondering over the right career path at a point in our lives. Our personality type according to the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) may not be a direct indicator of the perfect career fit. However, based on the strengths associated with each personality type, we may have a fair idea of suitable career choices. In this blog, we will be looking at the suitability of a career in sales for a person belonging to the ENFP personality type.

Are ENFP Good At Sales? 

Yes, a career in sales can be a good option for the ENFP personality type.

ENFP stands for Extraversion (E), Intuition (N), Feelings (F), and Perception (P). It is one of the sixteen personality types of the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI). In general, ENFP individuals are considered to be outgoing, warm, and creative. They are people-centered, with a deeply empathic self that allows them to understand the emotions and feelings of other people. They are creative in their approach to life, charting out possibilities from seemingly hopeless situations. 

Career in Sales

A career in sales is an interesting opportunity. It entails motivating others to buy a particular product or idea. Often this requires one to bring to the table good communication skills. Creativity plays a major role in finding out new ways to sell a particular product. Further, the salesperson needs to be adept at understanding the needs of the customer. This allows them to pitch the product in a way that fits with the customer’s needs.

Many qualities in the ENFP personality type make them suitable candidates for a career in sales.ENFP individuals are adept at being a good salesperson if they are interested in the job. If they do not find the idea of the job interesting enough, they might struggle with pursuing a career in sales. For the ENFP person, their morals are very important. If they do not feel inspired by what they’re doing, they’re unlikely to pursue it.

The ENFP person has a broad range of skills and abilities that make them potential candidates for a plethora of career choices.

Many career aptitude tests utilize the Holland Codes. These codes are essentially six themes, which are:

R- Realistic

A- Artistic

I-  Investigative

S- Social

E- Enterprising

C- Conventional

Together, it is known as the RAISEC Model. The test helps one identify their domains of interest. These domains are then combined to produce  three-letter Holland Code. This helps an individual identify potential career choices.

A career in sales falls under the Enterprising (E) domain.

This domain includes careers that cater to selling/promotion of ideas, products, and services. Some of the careers that fall in the enterprising domain include business, law, sales, politics, and journalism. These individuals harness the strength of their extroverted side.

A career in a sales role is well suited to the enthusiastic and people-oriented ENFP personality. ENFPs make good sales assistants and managers, as they are approachable and engaging.

As mentioned earlier, the ENFP is a people’s person. They are not drained in the presence of people. The ENFP has a charm and enthusiasm that allows them to navigate through the complexities of a career in sales.  The ENFP dislikes structure. They adopt a more flexible approach in life. Hence, they may be suited to work as sales representatives with a traveling element. Their approachability makes them very efficient sales managers.

Entrepreneurship

For many ENFP individuals, entrepreneurship can be a potential career within the enterprising domain. They find a sense of flexibility in entrepreneurship. It caters to their preference for autonomy and flexibility, which may not be offered by a typical 9 to 5 job. They might dip their fit in the different ideas for their business; from writing, fine arts, photography to counseling. They will find a way to market their products and skills. In fact, many ENFP might enjoy the process of doing so.

Their dominant function of Extroverted Intuition (Ne) makes them highly suited for careers in entrepreneurship.

ENFP Careers

Other potential careers for the ENFP based on the Holland Code (source: personalityjunkie.com)

Realistic Careers

  • Landscape architecture
  • Forestry, parks, recreation; park ranger

Investigative Careers

  • Humanities / liberal arts researcher, research assistant, scholar
  • Social sciences (sociology, psychology, anthropology, political science, history, geography)
  • Physician/doctor of medicine, psychiatry
  • College professor

Artistic Careers

  • Actor
  • Comedy writer, comedian
  • Musician
  • Graphic / website / UX / UI design
  • Creative media professional
  • Photography, photographer
  • Worship arts director
  • Writer, novelist, blogger, editor
  • Playwright, dramatist, screenwriter
  • Self / Indy Publishing

Social Careers

  • Teacher
  • Priest, pastor, minister
  • Life coach
  • Trainer
  • Translator / languages
  • Mediator, diplomat, peace work
  • Psychologist: health, clinical, counseling, organizational
  • Counselor, social worker
  • Art or music therapist

Enterprising Careers

  • Entrepreneur
  • Journalist, reporter, news anchor
  • Radio host, podcaster
  • Motivational speaker
  • Marketing

Conventional Careers

  • Careers in this domain are typically avoided by ENFPs.

The ENFP and Work

The ENFP is considered to be a very creative personality. They use this to express themselves and also contribute to the welfare of others. They tend to thrive in opportunities that allow them to make a difference in society. For an ENFP to feel truly satisfied with their work, it is important their work aligns with their beliefs and morals. Money rarely tends to be a motivator for the ENFP. They like to generate creative solutions to problems that are affecting people. They make for fine leaders who empower and motivate other individuals.

The ENFP does not like working within the restricted confines of a routine. They might feel overwhelmed in the midst of strict schedules and deadlines.

ENFP – Overview

The ENFP personality has a way around people. They are empathic individuals who are able to experience the feelings of another person from within their frame of reference. They harbor a genuine concern for people. They will readily step to motivate a person, offering courage and support. Along with a deep desire to bring about change, they are also able to visualize possibilities for the future. They will always show a concern for the people they lead, believing in each person’s potential. This essentially makes them adept at leadership positions.

They are constantly seeking new stimuli. This keeps life exciting for them. Hence, they tend to get distracted readily. They are extremely creative individuals. They will be able to conjure up many ideas for the future. However, they might struggle to see it through fruition. Their dislike for routine finds them approaching life with a flexible stance. They will grapple with leading an organized life and often tend to give in to procrastination.

Strengths

The ENFP person is warm and caring. They harbor a genuine concern for people. They are deeply empathic individuals, who tend to be aware of how someone is feeling. Consequently, they thrive in atmospheres that allow them to empower others. They are eager to bring about a change in society. The ENFP person has very good communication skills. Their inner world is replete with ideas, theories, and a wild imagination. This allows them to be very creative in different areas of their life. They are spontaneous, ready to go about without a plan at hand. They are extremely fun to be around. They value their relationships and tend to be very loyal to their partners.

Weaknesses

The ENFP person struggles with overthinking. There is always a lack of surety looming over their decisions. They tend to go back and forth, analyzing their actions or decisions. This can create many problems for the ENFP. They are unlikely to be organized. Consequently, they find themselves struggling to maintain a routine. This might lead to procrastination. They do not work too well with deadlines. If they find themselves bogged down by work, they can become easily stressed.

Conclusion

In this blog post, we answered the question: Are ENFP Good at Sales? We also looked at some of the other potential career options for the ENFP and a few interesting aspects of the ENFP personality type.

Frequently Asked Questions: Are ENFP Good at Sales?

What are ENFP good at?

ENFP individuals are very enthusiastic. They harbor a genuine concern for other people. They are adept at understanding what others are feeling. Their zeal, creativity, charisma, and people skills make them very efficient leaders (verywellmind.com).

Are ENFPs intelligent?

Typically, the ENFP person is more emotional. They tend to follow their hearts more than their minds. They rank high on emotional intelligence. Further, their minds are very complex with a plethora of ideas, theories, and thoughts, which they love to explore (personalitygrowth.com).

Are ENFP dominant?

According to psychologyjunkie.com, the ENFP personality type is considered to be highly dominant. These individuals are always eager to jump into new possibilities and plans.

Who should an ENFP marry?

The INFP personality type’s dominant function is Extraverted Intuition. It is best matched with a partner having a dominant function of Introverted Intuition. Therefore, the ideal match for an ENFP would be INTJ or INFJ (personalitypage.com).

References

ENFP

The Champion

https://www.truity.com/personality-type/ENFP/careers

Here’s How Good You Are at Sales, According to Your Personality Type

ENFP Careers, Jobs, & Majors

https://personalityjunkie.com/enfp-careers-jobs-majors/

Divya is currently a Clinical Psychology Trainee in a Master of Philosophy program and holds a Master’s in clinical psychology. She has a special interest in Personality studies and disorders, having researched the subject before, and Neuropsychology; with an additional interest being Mood disorders. She likes to write about Psychiatric issues, having worked in multiple specialty setups during her time as a clinical psychology student, and in her free time she likes to cook and read.