Which MBTI is the most annoying?

Which MBTI is the most annoying? In this article, we will look at MBTI types at their annoying, irritating and probably the worst side.

Among the most common ways to quantify the psychological or personality types of Carl Jung is the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI).  It is a standardized self-report inventory which is used to determine the personality type of an individual, preferences and judgment.

The MBTI is more of a preliminary step instead of a finishing line for self-discovery. At the very least, the test suggests that people mostly behave differently because they perceive and communicate differently with the environment.

If the MBTI allows people to recognize that these different worldviews will arise from their disputes, then that alone could make this process valuable.

There are four key dichotomies of preferences in MBTI. The 16 MBTI personality types are identified as a result of interaction between these four dichotomies of preferences. The theoretical foundation of MBTI is based on Carl Jung’s theory.

Remember that these descriptions are applicable only when people are at an immature and possibly worst level. This is not a defining point for any personality.

Enjoy reading!

Which MBTI is the most annoying? 

ISTJ: Annoying Traits

With their “law book” on how life is supposed to be lived, annoying ISTJs like to pound others over the head. Annoying ISTJs, like all annoying styles, see others that don’t like them as missing. Feelers are unreasonable and get embroiled in other people’s affairs excessively. 

The perceiver is lazy. Intuitive people have a lot of wild, impractical ideas. They fold their arms and smirk at the ways of others, and in an attempt to “help” others be better versions of themselves, they will either quietly judge or offer blunt truths. 

The only thing they really want is for others to aspire to be something like them.

ESTJ: Annoying Traits

Annoying ESTJs want to expose individuals to how things should be handled. By debating vigorously and going into unnecessary depth as a way to overwhelm their rivals, they feel their way is the only correct way and will shut down dissenting opinions. 

They have to be in charge, and they take pride in their simple, black-and-white views. When they unintentionally hurt someone’s feelings, they blame the other person for being a “snowflake” or overly sensitive, refusing to take responsibility for their harshness. 

They are more likely to notice faults in other people’s actions rather than looking inward to see their own flaws.

ISTP: Annoying Traits

Since ISTPs are sovereign, non-controlling people, you’ll rarely find them being annoying in the conventional sense. Some types could, however, see them as overly aloof and critical. ISTPs can offend others and fail to see the inter-personal meaning of situations in an attempt to be truthful. 

They can look down on individuals with other interests as well, seeing them as incorrect rather than different. As oversensitive or flighty, they may see feelers as overly interfering or responsive and intuitive.

 INTP: Annoying Traits

INTPs tend to be very private people that, in the conventional sense, are unlikely to seem annoying. They are more likely to irritate others by being unnecessarily critical, forgetful, or emotionless. 

These INTPs prefer to be alone, but if forced to communicate with others, they can point out logical inconsistencies and believe they know what the other person is going to say before they say it. For them, interrupting or ‘tuning out’ of the conversation is common. 

Unhealthy INTPs, like all unhealthy styles, have a propensity to criticize interests that aren’t their own. They may see feeling styles as being unreasonable or overly concerned with others, and sensors may be seen as boring or unimaginative.

ENFP: Annoying Traits 

ENFPs who are annoying are easily distracted, self-centered, and have strong opinions. They are pushy in their way of thinking and will try to get everyone on board with their viewpoint relentlessly. They see people who do not agree with them as conformists or narrow-minded. 

ENFPs at this point of development are so focused on creativity and innovation that they keep trying to “improve” items that aren’t broken. 

They will fluctuate from idea to idea and project to project, becoming inconsistent and unreliable in their attempts to bring excitement and interest to their lives.

ISFJ: Annoying Traits

Annoying ISFJs offer the impression of having it all together and appear polite and welcoming at first glance. But it doesn’t take long for a sense of self-righteousness to seep into everything they do. 

They try to support and care about others, but they develop a martyr complex as a result of never feeling noticed or validated sufficiently. They appear to slip into bouts of self-pity towards the individuals around them and become passive-aggressive.

ENFJ: Annoying Traits

In the affairs of others, annoying ENFJs appear to over-involve themselves. They can be overbearing, needy, on their way, and insistent. They see themselves as peacemakers and like to think they know what is in the best interest of everyone else. 

Although at first sight they seem polite and welcoming, over time they can be critical and passive-aggressive to individuals who have different views about how things should be done. They get particularly upset with people who, even for good reason, disrupt harmony. 

These ENFJs prefer to take what they consider as the moral high ground in a debate and become judgmental and self-righteous, using defective reasoning to justify their beliefs.

ESFJ: Annoying Traits 

Annoying ESFJs in front of others are desperate never to lose face. In social settings, they try to take a leading position so that they never have to feel out-of-the-loop or guided by someone who calls on them to behave against their natural preferences. 

They love gossip and other ways of contact that make them feel like members of a private club. They may also be negative and judgmental towards individuals who do not share their beliefs or who do not respect social rules or customs.

ESTP: Annoying Traits 

Annoying ESTPs want to be the subject and talk about others, disturb them, and become loud and overbearing. They can make inconsiderate jokes as they get caught up in the moment, or be shockingly frank and tactless as a way to get some momentum going. 

At this stage of growth, ESTPs may become insensitive to the emotions of those around them. This can lead to reckless mockery of others, even though the perpetrator isn’t trying to offend.

INTJ: Annoying Traits

INTJs who are annoying also think they know what other people are going to say before they say it. They finish other people’s sentences, interrupt, and criticize before the speaker has finished their argument. 

Seeing feelers as less intelligent and sensors as bland or narrow-minded, they seem condescending and patronizing. They are overconfident in their ability to position themselves as the ultimate thought leader on any subject. 

They appear to be bad listeners and are cut off from their natural capacity to empathize with others’ experiences and to understand them.

ISFP: Annoying Traits

Since ISFPs are relatively reserved and prefer to adopt a “live and let live” mindset, in the traditional sense, they are rarely annoying. In situations of conflict, however, unhealthy ISFPs may become severely judgmental and self-righteous. 

In a world full of conformists, they appear to see themselves as “misfits” and can become uncharacteristically frank and aggressive in their assault on those with contrary views if pushed. 

This is particularly true if such views contradict one of their personal values. Since they are so engrossed in their own experience, they may be unaware of how others view them.

ENTJ: Annoying Traits

Annoying ENTJs are critical and strongly argumentative. They see ways where things might be different, but this transforms into action that seeks fault, as well as a desire to manipulate and dominate. 

They may become offensive and condescending verbally, pointing out the shortcomings of other people and questioning their logic without giving them an opportunity to defend themselves. Their non-preferred interests are generally regarded negatively by them. 

Feelers are “irrational” and “boring conformists” are sensors of them. They are unable to grow and evolve as individuals, and their relationships are severely hindered as a result of their superiority complex.

ESFP: Annoying Traits 

Annoying ESFPs want excitement to be generated and go to whatever lengths to do so. To get a laugh, they appear to talk loudly, cause mischief, or embarrass themselves or others. 

They appear to find cynical or reserved people annoying and repulsive, and if they try to get a word in, they can ignore their opinion on things or shut them down. Annoying ESFPs tend to find individuals with opposite interests as “false,” like other unhealthy forms. 

Thinkers are seen as cold or uncaring and as impractical or pretentious by intuitive people.

ENTP: Annoying Traits

Those ENTPs who are annoying are brash, condescending, and excessively interested in novelty. In new ways, they want to try something, and they can go crazy and waste time modifying things that are already working. 

They’re often prone to being abrasive, unable to give up a point and even resorting to warped logic to defend their positions. ENTPs typically see preferences outside of their own as negative or meaningless at this stage of growth. 

They can see feeling forms as irrational or over-sensitive and as dull and conforming types of sensation. This attitude prevents them from honing their abilities or strengthening their influence over their shortcomings.

INFJ: Annoying Traits

Since INFJs aren’t naturally pushy or loud, they don’t come off as annoying in the conventional sense. However, because many INFJs have a hard time standing up for themselves, they can build annoying coping mechanisms because of the things they want in life. 

In order not to be mistaken, they appear to find themselves camouflaging their true existence. Resentment, self-pity, or a sense of being depressed is typically the product of this. 

At this stage of growth, INFJs may assume that others are conspiring against them or hate them, and they may misread others’ signs and take things personally that weren’t intended to be negative or critical. 

This way of thinking can lead over time to passive aggression, a complex of martyrs, or a chronic feeling of uneasiness in the world.

INFP: Annoying Traits

In the conventional sense of the term, since INFPs are normally reserved and open-minded, they are generally not annoying. If they believe their ideals are challenged, however, or if they are in circumstances of conflict, they may become over-sensitive, self-pitying and self-righteous. 

Such forms of INFPs fail to consider the fact that the view or way of life of someone else could be dependent on it. They might instead take a morally superior approach, rejecting the opinions of other people as unethical or cruel. 

At this stage of growth, INFPs may tend to have a status of being misunderstood because it reinforces the belief that they are the only ones battling oppression.

Conclusion

In this article, we analyzed MBTI types at their annoying, irritating and probably the worst side. Remember that these descriptions were applicable only when people are at an immature and possibly worst level. This was not a defining point for any personality.

FAQs: Which MBTI is the most annoying?

Which MBTI type is most annoying?

There is no straightforward answer to this. Nobody is entirely annoying but everyone has some traits which may come as annoying to others.

Are INFJs annoying?

Since INFJs aren’t naturally pushy or loud, they don’t come off as annoying in the conventional sense. However, because many INFJs have a hard time standing up for themselves, they can build annoying coping mechanisms because of the things they want in life.

How INTJs can be annoying during a conversation?

INTJs who are annoying also think they know what other people are going to say before they say it. They finish other people’s sentences, interrupt, and criticize before the speaker has finished their argument.

What is annoying about ESFP’s perspective about others?

Annoying ESFPs tend to find individuals with opposite interests as “false,” like other unhealthy forms. 

What is annoying about ESTPs?

Annoying ESTPs want to be the subject and talk about others, disturb them, and become loud and overbearing. They can make inconsiderate jokes as they get caught up in the moment, or be shockingly frank and tactless as a way to get some momentum going.

What is annoying about ENFPs?

In the affairs of others, annoying ENFJs appear to over-involve themselves. They can be overbearing, needy, on their way, and insistent. They see themselves as peacemakers and like to think they know what is in the best interest of everyone else. 

References

https://www.verywellmind.com/the-myers-briggs-type-indicator-2795583

https://www.psychologyjunkie.com/2018/10/11/the-obnoxious-versions-of-every-myers-briggs-personality-type/

Divya is currently a Clinical Psychology Trainee in a Master of Philosophy program and holds a Master’s in clinical psychology. She has a special interest in Personality studies and disorders, having researched the subject before, and Neuropsychology; with an additional interest being Mood disorders. She likes to write about Psychiatric issues, having worked in multiple specialty setups during her time as a clinical psychology student, and in her free time she likes to cook and read.