MBTI Types when Angry (A complete review)

In this blog post, let us unravel the answer to how and why different MBTI personality types get angry and what they do about it.

MBTI stands for Myer-Briggs Type Indicator that is a widely used tool to determine personality type of a person. The Myers-Briggs theory of personality, is a theory drawn from the theory of psychological types proposed by humanitarian psychologist Carl Yung. These personality types are structured around as reference points to understand unique personalities. These types fall into four key dimensions that can be used to categorize people into 16 types.

When MBTI Types get Angry

People get angry for various different reasons. For all 16 different types of the MBTI personalities, anger is an emotion that is experienced and processed in unique ways and for different reasons. The intent and motivation behind their anger and things that fuel it further are different as well. For instance, ISFPs are the type most likely to get upset or angry and show it. On the other hand, some other types preferred to deal with anger on their own and sort it out internally.

MBTI Personality Types

As mentioned earlier, there are 16 types that is categorized by the MBTI determined by 4 dimensions as mentioned below:

Introversion vs. Extraversion (I/E)

This function indicates the source and energy of a person’s energy expression. An extravert derives their energy mainly from the external world, while the introverts mainly from their own internal world.

Sensing vs. Intuition (S/N)

This function indicates the way through which an individual perceives and processes information. A person with sensing dominance is more likely to rely on information they receive from the outside world that is tangible and concrete. A person with a dominant intuitive function tends to rely on information from their own internal and abstract world which holds meaning of the underlying theory and principles.

Thinking vs. Feeling (T/F)

This function represents the process of decision-making of individuals. Thinking function indicates that an individual makes decisions based on logic and rationale while Feeling function indicates that an individual bases their decision on emotions.

Judging vs. Perceiving (J/P)

This function represents the way in which an individual implements or relates to the information processed in the context of the outside world. The Judging function indicates how organized one keeps their life while the perception function indicates how explorative and improvising an individual can be in life.

These dimensions are a dichotomy giving rise to preferences or a style that an individual chooses. These combined four dimensions create a 16-broad spectrum of predictable patterns consisting of thoughts and behaviours. The 16 different types of personalities as indicated below:

MBTI Types get Angry: What ticks them off?

Each MBTI type has its own unique set of characteristics that let them perceive, interact with and experience the world. Given that, each type also has its own meaning and sense to what and how they experience anger. The reasons they get angry is largely dependent on the things they value most in life, their priorities, whims, maturity level and the style of interaction they have with other people. The level of anger also largely varies on the way they make decisions and how they perceive and process information. Let us take a look at why each MBTI type gets angry and how they express it to the world.

ISTJ – Introverted Sensing Thinking Judging

ISTJs are significantly reliable and reserved folks. They prefer to keep anger and offences private than to lash out. They are the kind that look at the facts of the situation, analysing them thoroughly before coming to any conclusion. ISTJs have a keen sense of right and wrong, especially in their area of interest and / or responsibility.

What enrages them: Some of the things that enrage an ISTJ include unreliability, being undervalued or discredited, not being punctual, having to adapt to an unexpected change, disloyalty and dealing with impractical people.

What they do: Once they are in a bout of rage, they retreat and do not want to be bothered until they come out of it voluntarily. One can expect oscillating hot and cold treatment from ISTJs and this may take some time to be over.

What they could do instead: Instead of retreating, ISTJs can work on their expression of anger by asking the person they are upset with to explain their point of view and then share their own reasons.

ESTJ – Extraverted Sensing Thinking Judging

Often known as supervisors, ESTJs thrive on order and continuity. Their focus involves organization of people and they are content to enforce “the rules,” often dictated by tradition or handed down from a higher authority. Power, position and prestige should be worked for and earned. ESTJs are straight-forward when it comes to their anger. Naturally, they do not beat around the bush and hence are often misunderstood for their anger as well.

What enrages them: Some of the things that enrage ESTJs significantly are incompetence, procrastination, unreliability, being surrounded by disorganization and having their time wasted.

What they do: ESTJs make continual remarks and orders expressing their frustration which may make others feel belittled.

What they could do instead: ESTJs could take a moment to consider their reaction to a situation and change it into a response that does not affect relationships with the people they are upset with.

ISTP – Introverted Sensing Thinking Perceiving

Widely known as the crafter, ISTPs live on the edge; they are at their best in a crisis, where their natural disregard for rules and authority structures allows them to focus on and tackle the emergency at hand in the most effective way. ISTPs rarely get angry but, express it quickly.

What enrages them: ISTPs get enraged with people who complain constantly, people who lack respect for their privacy, being controlled and micro-managed, being forced into decisions or taking decisions for them.

What they do: ISTPs become argumentative and shut down people when they are upset. They also tend to take words and meaning out of context as it affects their space to decide on their own.

What they could do instead: ISTPs can instead put aside the arguments and focus on the solution for the initial problem.

ESTP – Extraverted Sensing Thinking Perceiving

Commonly known as the promoter, ESTPs are spontaneous, daring and active folks. Persons of this type have a natural drive to best the competition. They usually keep their anger in check and until they are overstressed or overwhelmed.

What enrages them: Some of the significant things that send ESTPs over their usual cool are impractical and unrealistic people, being controlled or micro-managed, chatterboxes who do not have a point and people who disrespect.

What they do: ESTPs become rigid and serious when they are upset.

What they could do instead: ESTPs can instead find a constructive release for their energy such as something recreational to get their aggression out and distract themselves.

ISFJ – Introverted Sensing Feeling Judging

Often known as protectors, ISFJs are methodical and accurate workers, often with very good memories and unexpected analytic abilities; They are patient and genuinely sympathetic in approach to dealing with others. When ISFJs are distressed, they tend to keep their anger repressed and sort things out internally.

What enrages them: Some of the things that enrage ISFJs are inconsiderate or rude people, messiness and disorder, having their values and experiences de-valued and arrogance.

What they do: ISFJ tend to hold their anger in but become sarcastic and let out their anger in passive-aggressive bouts.

What they could do instead: What ISFJs can do instead is that they can communicate their distress to the opposite party and brainstorm together to avoid it in the future.

ESFJ – Extroverted Sensing Feeling Judging

Widely known as providers, ESFJs see problems clearly and delegate easily, work hard and play with zest. When a decision must be made, especially one involving the risk of conflict they pressurize themselves with contradictions in their mind. When angered, ESFJs turn firm and tight-lipped. They usually tend to deal with stress by turning to someone they trust and venting out.

What enrages them: What enrages ESFJs the most are rudeness and inconsiderate behaviour, trolling, hurting their loved ones and procrastination.

What they do: ESFJs become extremely opinionated and defensive when they are angered. They also forgive easily but never forget.

What they could do instead: ESFJs ought to learn to process the feelings of hurt and let go for an enriching life.

ISFP – Introverted Sensing Feeling Perceiving

Commonly recognized as composers, ISFPs live in the here and now. ISFJs are driven by impulse and grand experiences, often setting trends in whatever they engage in. They often keep their temper in check even in the harshest situations. ISFPs tend to get upset rather than outright angry.

What enrages them: ISFPs get enraged by being told how to think, liars, being labelled, arrogance and hypocrisy

What they do: ISFPs tend to hold in their anger, having a hard time from blowing up. For the same reason, they tend to avoid the people they are mad at.

What they could do instead: Collaborate with the party they are mad with and listen to their reasons while telling their own is something ISFPs can do.

ESFP – Extraverted Sensing Feeling Perceiving

Often known as performers, the spontaneous, impulsive nature of this type is almost always entertaining. They love to be at the centre of the stage and perform. ESFPs are attracted to new ideas, new fashions and new gadgets continually. When angered, ESFPs tend to react rather than respond to the situation.

What enrages them: Some of the things that enrage an ESFP include being micro-managed, being stuck in a sedentary lifestyle, feeling trapped, being ignored and underestimated.

What they do: ESFPs are quick to react and blow off their steam by venting out to people. They also tend to complain and stand up for themselves a lot.

What they could do instead: Instead, ESFPs can take a moment to calm down before they make a scene and think of the best response to the situation.

INFJ – Introverted iNtuition Feeling Judging

Widely known as the counsellors, INFJs have the clearest insights of all the types into the motivations of others, for good and for evil. INFJs tend to have strong writing skills and tend to be idealists. When enraged, INFJs usually repressed them to sort it out privately. For most INFJs getting angry in itself is a stressful situation.

What enrages them: What enrages INFJs are having their intentions misrepresented, condescension, injustice, overbearing people and interruptions.

What they do: INFJs when deeply angered, tend to criticize their opposition cruelly.

What they could do instead: What INFJs could do instead is that they recognize the subjective and objective nature of the issue and separate the person from the problem.

ENFJ – Extroverted iNtuition Feeling Judging

Commonly known as teachers, ENFJs have tremendous power to manipulate others with their phenomenal interpersonal skills and unique salesmanship. ENFJs are global learners. They see the big picture. The ENFJs focus is expansive. ENFJs do not get angered easily but when they do, they need at least one true friend to confide in to process their feelings.

What enrages them: Some of the things that enrage ENFJs include having their intentions misrepresented, disrespect, narrow-mindedness and betrayal.

What they do: ENFJs have clear boundaries and when they are crossed, they turn bitter and often attack the opposite party with cruel personal truths about them

What they could do instead: What ENFJs could do instead is that they recognize the subjective and objective nature of the issue and separate the person from the problem.

 INFP – Introverted iNtuition Feeling Perceiving

Often known as healers, INFPs have the ability to see good in almost anyone or anything. INFPs struggle with the issue of their own ethical perfection. INFPs also never seem to lose their sense of wonder. When angered, INFPs tend to most likely get alone as they dislike conflicts and tantrums.

What enrages them: Some of the things that gets the INFPs angered are being micro-managed, dishonesty, being underestimated and hypocrisy.

What they do: They tend to distance themselves to evaluate the situation. They may also give the opposition a silent treatment they are upset with.

What they could do instead: The best thing INFPs could do is to communicate that they need the space to evaluate the situation to the people they are upset with.

ENFP – Extraverted iNtuition Feeling Perceiving

Widely known as champions, ENFPs are both “idea”-people and “people”-people. ENFPs often have strong values and viewpoints. They tend to try to use their social skills and contacts to persuade others gently. Usually when angered or upset, ENFPs distract themselves from it to deal with it later on.

What enrages them: Narrow-mindedness, emotional manipulation, guilt-tripping, small talk and inconsiderate behaviour angers ENFPs

What they do: ENFPs tend to either understand the opposition’s point of view or shut them out to distract themselves away from the situation.

What they could do instead: Instead, ENFPs could take a moment to sit down with the person they are angry with to understand the intent behind their situations.

INTJ – Introverted iNtuition Thinking Judging

Commonly known as masterminds, people of this type are perfectionists. INTJs tend to lack patience and less understanding of such things as small talk and flirtation. They have an unusual independence of mind, freeing them from the constraints of authority, convention, or sentiment for its own sake. INTJs do not usually get angry and even if they do, their anger seems to be mostly silent.

What enrages them: Some of the things that anger the INTJs are incompetence, ignorance, having their inputs dismissed and being pushed to social decisions they are not ready for.

What they do: INTJs tend to presume that the person they are mad at is incompetent and becomes vengeful. This is because they hate it if they are undermined and belittled.

What they could do instead: Instead INTJs need to communicate openly as to why they are upset with the opposition party.

ENTJ – Extraverted iNtuition Thinking Judging

Often known as field marshals, ENTJs have a natural tendency to direct and strategize. ENTJs are decisive and hence make good administrators. They see what needs to be done, and frequently assign roles to their fellows. ENTJs do get angry quickly but do not act on it before they analyse the situation.

What enrages them: Some of the things that tick off ENTJs are incompetence, disloyalty, complaining, being undermined and dismissed.

What they do: ENTJs are dangerous people to mess with as they may turn cold, calculating and argumentative.

What they could do instead: ENTJs must take time to reflect on their anger and conflict instead of getting into a strategy to ‘win.’

INTP – Introverted iNtuition Thinking Perceiving

Widely known as architects, INTPs are quite the analytical folks. They show great precision and are pragmatic in nature. They prioritize distinctions, sense and consistency even in casual conversations. INTPs are relatively easy-going and amenable. When angered, INTPs suppress it but, it may spill out in small bouts on occasion.

What enrages them: Things that enrage INTPs include misunderstandings, overbearing / pushy people, being micromanaged, emotional manipulation and narrow-mindedness.

What they do: INTPs tend to ignore their anger for prolonged periods of time, until they eventually snap in unexpected situations.

What they could do instead: INTPs can instead acknowledge their feelings rather than pushing them aside.

ENTP – Extraverted iNtuition Thinking Perceiving

Commonly known as inventors, ENTPs are verbally as well as cerebrally quick. They generally love to argue.  ENTPs are as innovative and ingenious at problem-solving. They are optimists, yet reluctant in execution as they are obsessed to do things in a new way. They are easy-going folks and engaging in nature. When angered, ENTPs tend to not like tantrums and do not blow up a situation when they are angry.

What enrages them: Some of the things that tick off ENTPs are logical fallacies, manipulation, being micromanaged, narrow-mindedness and being dismissed.

What they do: ENTPs tend to become expressive towards people they are angry with, and attack their insecurities either through subtle insults or in one blind rage.

What they could do instead: What ENTPs could do instead is that they view the person they are angry with separated from the problem. This will allow them to take a moment and evaluate the situation.

Summary

In conclusion, people get angry for various different reasons. For all 16 different types of the MBTI personalities, anger is an emotion that is experienced and processed in unique ways and for different reasons. The intent and motivation behind their anger and things that fuel it further are different as well. The reasons they get angry is largely dependent on the things they value most in life, their priorities, whims, maturity level and the style of interaction they have with other people. The level of anger also largely varies on the way they make decisions and how they perceive and process information.

FAQs: MBTI Types when Angry

Which MBTI is the scariest when angry?

INTP seems to be the scariest when angry because they do not let you know until you experience the consequence of your actions.

Which is scarier: an angry INTP or an angry INTJ?

INTPs tend to ignore their anger for prolonged periods of time, until they eventually snap in unexpected situations. INTJs tend to presume that the person they are mad at is incompetent and becomes vengeful. This is because they hate it if they are undermined and belittled. So, in the heat of the moment, an INTP is scarier than an INTJ.

What makes an ISFP angry?

ISFPs live in the here and now. ISFJs are driven by impulse and grand experiences, often setting trends in whatever they engage in. They often keep their temper in check even in the harshest situations. ISFPs tend to get upset rather than outright angry. Some of the things that get the INFPs angered are being micro-managed, dishonesty, being underestimated and hypocrisy.

What does it look like when an INTP gets angry?

INTPs are quite the analytical folks. They show great precision and are pragmatic in nature. They prioritize distinctions, sense and consistency even in casual conversations. INTPs are relatively easy-going and amenable. When angered, INTPs suppress it but, it may spill out in small bouts on occasion. Things that enrage INTPs include misunderstandings, overbearing / pushy people, being micromanaged, emotional manipulation and narrow-mindedness. INTPs tend to ignore their anger for prolonged periods of time, until they eventually snap in unexpected situations.

References

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What Each Myers-Briggs Type Does When They’re Angry (And What They Should Do Instead). Thought Catalog. (2015, August 26). https://thoughtcatalog.com/heidi-priebe/2015/08/what-each-myers-briggs-type-does-when-theyre-angry-and-what-they-should-do-instead/.

Shobhana is a HR professional with a masters in Psychology. She believes that life-long learning is the only constant experience that uplifts the quality of life. She has experience in working with schools and consultancies for counselling and psychometric interventions. She is a proactive and resourceful individual who practices art-therapy and has a passion towards adding value in the fields of learning and development.

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